Agile vs Waterfall: choosing the right methodology

What is the waterfall approach?

Before working on a project, it is necessary for the team to decide on a methodology to use. Choosing a compatible method is indispensable to a successful project, as they give your project a structure, a framework, which you and your team can work and communicate by. The two most popular methodologies are the traditional waterfall approach and the agile approach. But which methodology should you choose for your own project? In order to help you make an informed decision, we compiled the most striking benefits of each model – and their respective challenges. Want to bring your project management to the next level? Then check out our article on the best tools for project managers here.

Phase 1: Kick-off: Exploring the Problem

The linear model consists of several phases that we want to briefly present. Note that, while there are several variations to the waterfall method consisting of phases that differ from each other, we will go with a 6-step model consisting of Requirements – Design – Implementation – Testing – Deployment – Maintenance.

As we said before, waterfall relies on heavy and detailed planning and documentation. These two things are wrestled with in this first phase.Each step also includes its own validation: the Design is validated against the requirements, the Coding validated against the Design, and so on.

The project manager collects as much information on the client’s requirements as possible. That means drafting a detailed document that thoroughly describes each phase of the project. The description includes aspects such as costs, timelines, assumptions, dependencies, risks, success metrics etc.

Of course, the deployment phase is not the final step – it is always followed by maintenance. You must thoroughly track the software’s performance, document any errors, defects, and change requests from users. That way, you can properly start the process of updating the software and adding new features in the future.

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Phase 2: Discovery & Research

The linear model consists of several phases that we want to briefly present. Note that, while there are several variations to the waterfall method consisting of phases that differ from each other, we will go with a 6-step model consisting of Requirements – Design – Implementation – Testing – Deployment – Maintenance.

Each step also includes its own validation: the Design is validated against the requirements, the Coding validated against the Design, and so on.

The project manager collects as much information on the client’s requirements as possible. That means drafting a detailed document that thoroughly describes each phase of the project. The description includes aspects such as costs, timelines, assumptions, dependencies, risks, success metrics etc.

Phase 3: UX and UI design

The linear model consists of several phases that we want to briefly present. Note that, while there are several variations to the waterfall method consisting of phases that differ from each other, we will go with a 6-step model consisting of Requirements – Design – Implementation – Testing – Deployment – Maintenance.

The project manager collects as much information on the client’s requirements as possible. That means drafting a detailed document that thoroughly describes each phase of the project. The description includes aspects such as costs, timelines, assumptions, dependencies, risks, success metrics etc.

Of course, the deployment phase is not the final step – it is always followed by maintenance. You must thoroughly track the software’s performance, document any errors, defects, and change requests from users. That way, you can properly start the process of updating the software and adding new features in the future.

Sustainability

The linear model consists of several phases that we want to briefly present. Note that, while there are several variations to the waterfall method consisting of phases that differ from each other, we will go with a 6-step model consisting of Requirements – Design – Implementation – Testing – Deployment – Maintenance.Each step also includes its own validation: the Design is validated against the requirements, the Coding validated against the Design, and so on.

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